Curio Critique # 6: On wood working in schools

Curio Critique # 5: The British interest in art education
July 16, 2017
Curio Critique # 7: When handwriting matters!
July 16, 2017
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Sl. No. Curio Book Title Year of Publication
6 Elementary Woodworking 1903

Curio Book

 
 

Curio reference

The author Edwin W.Foster in the Preface states:

“It is with earnest hope that nature study and manual work may be closely correlated...No better period can be selected in which the study of trees, their leaves, bark, wood, learning by experience its grain, hardness, color and value in the arts...”
 

Related references

Interestingly in India, the National Institute of Open Schooling offers a course in Carpentry.
 
 
The course has the following objectives:

*Identify and select the right type of wood for various applications.
*Acquire required in the knowledge and practical skills in wood cutting, joining and other allied operations.
*Acquire required in the trade knowledge and practical skills in engineering measurements.
*Acquire experience in preventive and corrective maintenance of various cutting tools, machine tools and equipment.
*Finish various jobs within specified time and resource limits, with proper measurements and evaluate them by appropriate methods and tools.
Source
http://www.nios.ac.in/departmentsunits/vocational-education/stand-alone-courses/carpentry.aspx
The Telegraph in 2008 reported Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills of the of UK) children missing out on woodwork:
 
 
For some, carpentry is a passion. Ekadanta Aggarwal’s post on ‘Versatility of Modern Carpentry’ begins : I’ve had friends and family members that have been involved in all manners of white and blue collar work, and one field that has always been in high demand for millennia has been woodworking and carpentry...

Source http://www.awtc.in/the-versatility-of-modern-carpentry/

A couple of kilometres away from the Govt. College of Teacher Education, Thycaud, Thiruvananthapuram stands a fine palace noted for its wood carvings. The Kuthiramalika as it is called (‘Kuthira’ means ‘horse’ and ‘Malika’ means ‘palace’) was built in 1844 by the renowned musician king Swathi Thirunal. The palace has wooden carved structures of prancing horses along the entire length of its upper floors. It also has ornate carved ceiling too.
It is told that carpenters vied with one another to please the king by designing unique roof supporting structures. It is a pity that wood working is seldom taught in schools in Kerala State anymore.
Curio Quest In modern times, should we give due emphasis to the teaching of wood working ? Would there be a potential job market?

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